Philadelphia homicides drop sharply in October

With only 16 new victims reported over the 28-day period ending on November 2nd, the homicide rate in Philadelphia plummeted by more than 40 percent from the previous 28 days, according to the latest update from the Philadelphia Police Department.

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Last year, October homicides increased slightly when compared to the previous month, and the same was true in 2012, according to the police department’s annual homicide report.

Average Philadelphia temperatures dropped by about 10 degrees from September to October, according to the National Weather Service, but that was true for the past two years as well.

Looking ahead, November homicide rates have dropped sharply when compared with October in recent years.

Total 2014 Philadelphia homicides are still running close to five percent ahead of last year’s pace, with 220 victims now reported this year to date, according to the police department’s Crime Maps and Stats page.

In recent years, more than 80 percent of Philadelphia homicides have been committed with guns, according to police data

Beginning now, the Gun Crisis reporting project will cease daily reporting, as we recently announced.

A new home page will soon direct visitors to all of the resources we have produced since launching in 2012.

Please keep in touch with us on Facebook and Twitter, and subscribe now to receive our continuing free monthly email newsletter.

Thank you for your attention to gun violence in Philadelphia.

Gun Crisis Reporting Project curtailing operations; will halt daily reporting

The sun sets over West Somerset Street in Kensington, during a six-hour gun violence outbreak last year which left two people dead and six more wounded. Photographs for the Gun Crisis Reporting Project by Joseph Kaczmarek.

After publishing every day for more than two and a half years — illuminating the epidemic of gun violence in Philadelphia and seeking solutions — the Gun Crisis Reporting Project will cease daily reporting this Friday, November 7th.

For now, we will continue gathering and analyzing data, participating in community events, and will continue to respond to crime scenes, memorials, and other events when possible. And we plan to keep producing and distributing our free monthly email newsletter.

Meanwhile, we have compiled all of our posts in the #GunCrisis Knowledge Base, which you can also find in the menu at the left of each page, except for previous incident reports, which you can find by searching the site.

Complete details ->

Introducing the #GunCrisis Knowledge Base

This playlist includes 16 past videos with a total running time of 45 minutes, and includes several produced by the Gun Crisis Reporting Project, others in which we collaborated with national and international news organizations, and one lightning talk explaining our mission and strategy.

Over the past few weeks, we have been editing the #GunCrisis Knowledge Base, a compendium containing nearly every #GunCrisis post we have published since launching in March 2012, sorted by category with the exception of incident reports, which now number greater than 1,500. (Use the search window in the left column to search for individual incidents reports.)

<- You can find the Knowledge Base in the left column menu.

Knowledge Base Contents:

Within each category below, the most recent links are at the top of the list.

• The State of Gun Violence in Philadelphia
• Philadelphia Gun Violence in National Context
• Intervention Programs
• Community Response
• Social Media Response
• Leaders
• Feature Reports
• Artists Respond to Gun Violence
• #GunCrisis Monthly Newsletters
• Solution of the Day
• Photojournalism
• Essential #GunCrisis Maps
• #GunCrisis Sandy Hook Reports
• National Incident Summaries
• #GunCrisis Community Participation
• Media coverage of Gun Crisis Reporting Project
• Professional Honors
• Community Honors
#GunCrisis Project Status Reports
#GunCrisis Video Index

A few posts have been omitted to reduce redundancy, and sometimes for linking to external content which is no longer available, but please let us know if you have links which you think we need to repair.

Philadelphia CeaseFire hosting “A Game of Peace Basketball Tournament” Wednesday night in North Philadelphia

Above: Players compete in Philadelphia CeaseFire’s “A Game of Peace Basketball Tournament” last year. Photograph for the Gun Crisis Reporting Project by Jim MacMillan.

The next Philadelphia CeaseFire “A Game of Peace” tournament is almost here:

Wednesday, October 8th, from 6-9 p.m. at the Martin Luther King Recreation Center, at 2101 Cecil B. Moore Avenue in North Philadelphia.

More information ->

#GunCrisis archives: Philadelphia gun violence in national context

Above: Mourners gather in remembrance of Philadelphia shooting victim Terrance “T-Bird” Cox this summer in the Nicetown section of Philadelphia. Photographs for the Gun Crisis Reporting Project by Joseph Kaczmarek.

At the Gun Crisis Reporting Project, we are presently working to organize all of our posts into a more accessible knowledge base. This group contains previous posts addressing Philadelphia gun violence and homicides in context with national rates. The most recent posts are at the top of each group.

2014:

• Philadelphia stays ahead of Chicago’s homicide rate through first 26 weeks of 2014
• Latest FBI data puts 2013 murder reductions in context
• Philadelphia still suffering higher homicide rate than largest cities, but also showing greater progress

2013:

• Homicides drop sharply in Philadelphia and New York, but unequal rates persist
• New York responds to violent outbreak while Philadelphia suffers four times as much
• Eleven dead, 80 wounded by gunfire in Philadelphia during one month period since Boston bombing news
• Philadelphia Commissioner Ramsey: We have a Sandy Hook happening all the time

2012:

• Philadelphia is “behind the curve” on implementing innovative gun violence solutions
• Report: Philadelphia stands out as most violent city
• 2012 U.S. Peace Index Highlights America’s Most and Least Peaceful States and Cities — and the cost of violence